Sensing with Multiagent Systems

We study systems containing many interacting components with a focus on sensing. Our research interests in this area are in: collective perception, distributed sensing, mobile nodes, swarming nodes, and collaborative sensing. We are interested in swarms of sensor agents, which, following very simple local rules, demonstrate emergent behaviours. Our research is inspired by nature and we believe that this class of systems will become tremendously important in tackling real world problems such as searching for survivors after an earthquake. We emphasise the importance of fabrication; such systems need to be low-cost and reliable, which adds another dimension to our research: manufacturability. Our research facilities at the University of Edinburgh lay the foundation for the development of new manufacturing processes and our collaboration with the University of Michigan in the United States combines world-leading expertise in bioinspired engineering, sensing, multiagent systems and data analysis.

Collective Perception in Multi Agent Systems

Markus Nemitz is a first year Ph.D. student at the University of Edinburgh and part of the Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) in Integrative Sensing and Measurement (ISM). He holds an academic affiliate position at the University of Michigan in the United States where he is supported by Professor Edwin Olson and Professor Alfred Hero. Markus recently won the best poster award at the annual CDT ISM conference. His poster "Collective Perception in Multi Agent Systems" describes his first year of integrated studies at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Glasgow, his research interests and ideas in distributed sensing, and the anticipated impact of our transatlantic research collaboration with the University of Michigan.



Centre for Doctoral Training in Integrative Sensing and Measurement

The combination of Sensing and Measurement is arguably the most fundamental scientific discipline required and utilised by society: it impacts on all areas of life from integrated atomic clocks for GPS location, through the myriad of chemical and physical sensors found in science, industry, environmental monitoring, consumer goods, biomedicine, food, energy and transport. The new EPSRC-funded Centre for Doctoral Training in Integrative Sensing and Measurement (CDT-ISM) provides a four-year PhD training regime tailored to develop the leaders of tomorrow in this exciting field. Students will be immersed in the world-leading, multidisciplinary research community within the Universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow together with our range of international and industrial partners, united by the approach, methods, techniques common to the ubiquitous range of applications of sensing and measurement.

Information on the CDT in Integrated Sensing and Measurement is provided here.